Medicare Supplement

How Much Is the Average Cost for Medicare Supplement Plan F?

Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) Plan F offers more benefits than other standardized Medigap plans. Find out the average cost of Plan F and learn about Medigap coverage options.

Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) Plan F is the most popular Medigap plan, with 53 percent of Medigap beneficiaries enrolled in Plan F.1

But how much does Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F cost?

The average premium for Medicare Supplement Plan F was $169.14 per month in 2018.2

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Learn more about the average cost of Medigap Plan F in each state in 2018, and find out if the benefits of Plan F work for your health coverage needs.

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What is the average cost of Medigap Plan F by state?

The chart below shows the average cost of Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F for each state in 2018.2

Plan F was less expensive in Iowa, New Mexico and South Carolina in 2018, and more expensive in New York, Connecticut and North Dakota. Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Wisconsin have different Medigap plan standards.

State Monthly Cost Rank
from least expensive (1) to most expensive (45)
Alabama $156.12 9
Alaska $254.62 42
Arizona $254.62 42
Arkansas $163.40 15
California $193.61 31
Colorado $169.34 23
Connecticut $310.09 44
Delaware $241.28 40
District of Columbia No data available N/A
Florida $213.23 37
Georgia $166.96 20
Hawaii $247.88 41
Idaho $166.18 19
Illinois $165.45 17
Indiana $173.25 24
Iowa $141.04 1
Kansas $156.08 8
Kentucky $160.85 13
Louisiana $181.44 27
Maine $222.58 38
Maryland $198.57 40
Massachusetts No data available N/A
Michigan $161.46 14
Minnesota $241.28 40
Mississippi $241.28 40
Missouri  $200.72 33
Montana  $178.50 25
Nebraska  $180.99 26
Nevada  $183.02 29
New Hampshire  $206.88 36
New Jersey  $204.64 34
New Mexico  $142.26 2
New York  $334.92 45
North Carolina  $154.12 6
North Dakota  $266.83 43
Ohio  $158.62 11
Oklahoma  $156.48 10
Oregon  $205.22 35
Pennsylvania  $165.40 16
Rhode Island  No data available N/A
South Carolina  $150.36 3
South Dakota  $188.23 30
Tennessee  $167.49 21
Texas  $167.98 22
Utah  $153.42 4
Vermont  No data available N/A
Virginia  $155.84 7
Washington  $226.29 39
West Virginia  $160.55 12
Wisconsin  No data available N/A
Wyoming  $165.58 18

Note: Plan cost data was not available for Massachusetts, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Vermont, Wisconsin and Washington D.C.

How much does high-deductible Plan F cost?

Plan F also offers a high-deductible option. With this Medigap plan option, you typically pay a lower premium in exchange for a higher deductible.  

The average premium for high deductible Plan F in 2018 was $57.16 per month, or roughly one-third of the average monthly cost of the traditional Plan F.2

In 2021, high-deductible Plan F offers an annual deductible of $2,370, meaning you are responsible for paying the first $2,370 worth of covered expenses before the plan’s coverage begins.

What can affect the average cost of Plan F?

The average cost of Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F — or any Medigap plan for that matter — can be influenced by a number of factors.

  • Location
    As you can see from the chart above, the average monthly cost of Medigap Plan F can vary quite a bit from one state to another. The cost of a Medicare Supplement Insurance plan can vary based on location in the same way that a gallon of gas or milk can.

  • Insurance carrier
    Medicare Supplement Insurance is sold by private insurance companies. These companies can set their own premium rates. A licensed insurance agent can help you compare plans from several different Medicare Supplement Insurance providers.

  • Benefits
    Because Plan F provides more benefits than any other type of Medigap plan, Plan F may have higher monthly premiums than other types of Medigap plans in some areas.

Other factors such as age, gender, smoking status and health can also affect Medigap plan rates.

Should I choose Medigap Plan F?

The true cost of a Medigap plan is not limited to just the monthly premium. You may also want to consider how much you will end up spending on out-of-pocket Medicare costs over the course of the year that your Medigap plan doesn’t cover.

One potential benefit of choosing Plan F is that it covers many out-of-pocket Medicare costs.

The chart below shows how Plan F compares with of other types of Medigap plans.

Click here to view enlarged chart Scroll to the right to continue reading the chart
Medicare Supplement Benefits A B C* D F1* G1 K2 L3 M N4
Part A coinsurance and hospital coverage                    
Part B coinsurance or copayment             50% 75%    
Part A hospice care coinsurance or copayment             50% 75%    
First 3 pints of blood             50% 75%    
Skilled nursing facility coinsurance             50% 75%    
Part A deductible             50% 75% 50%  
Part B deductible                    
Part B excess charges                    
Foreign travel emergency     80% 80% 80% 80%     80% 80%
* Plan F and Plan C are not available to Medicare beneficiaries who became eligible for Medicare on or after January 1, 2020. If you became eligible for Medicare before 2020,... you may still be able to enroll in Plan F or Plan C as long as they are available in your area.

1 Plans F and G offer high-deductible plans that each have an annual deductible of $2,370 in 2021. Once the annual deductible is met, the plan pays 100% of covered services for the rest of the year. The high-deductible Plan F is not available to new beneficiaries who became eligible for Medicare on or after January 1, 2020.

2 Plan K has an out-of-pocket yearly limit of $6,220 in 2021. After you pay the out-of-pocket yearly limit and yearly Part B deductible, it pays 100% of covered services for the rest of the calendar year.

3 Plan L has an out-of-pocket yearly limit of $3,110 in 2021. After you pay the out-of-pocket yearly limit and yearly Part B deductible, it pays 100% of covered services for the rest of the calendar year.

4 Plan N pays 100% of the Part B coinsurance, except for a copayment of up to $20 for some office visits and up to $50 copayment for emergency room visits that don’t result in an inpatient admission.
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What happened to Plan C and Plan F in 2020?

Some Medicare beneficiaries commonly ask, “Is Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F ending?”

The answer is that Plan F, as well as Plan C, are not ending. Because of a recent federal law, Plan F and Plan C are no longer available for Medicare beneficiaries who became eligible on or after January 1, 2020.

If you already had Plan C or Plan F before 2020, you will be able to keep your plan. If you became eligible for Medicare before 2020, you may still be able to buy either Plan C or Plan F if either is available where you live.

Read additional medicare costs guides to learn more about Medicare costs and how they will affect you.

Explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F costs where you live

A licensed insurance agent can help you explore the Medicare Supplement Plan F options that may be available in your area, including the average cost of your Medigap plan options.

Learn about Medigap plans in your area

Visit MedicareSupplement.com

 

1 AHIP. (June, 2020). State of Medigap: Trends in Enrollment and Demographics. Retrieved from https://www.ahip.org/wp-content/uploads/AHIP_State_of_Medigap-2020.pdf.

2 TZ Insurance Solutions LLC internal sales data, 2019. This data is based on the Medicare Supplement Insurance policies TZ Insurance Solutions LLC has sold. It is not a comprehensive national average of all available Medicare Supplement Insurance plan premiums.

Christian

About the author

Christian Worstell is a licensed insurance agent and a Senior Staff Writer for MedicareAdvantage.com. He is passionate about helping people navigate the complexities of Medicare and understand their coverage options.

His work has been featured in outlets such as Vox, MSN, and The Washington Post, and he is a frequent contributor to health care and finance blogs.

Christian is a graduate of Shippensburg University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. He currently lives in Raleigh, NC.

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