A Complete Guide to Elder Financial Abuse

If you feel that you or someone you know may have been or is at risk of being a victim of financial abuse, please consult our list of helpful state resources and national resources to report the abuse and take the next steps toward recovery.

In honor of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on June 15, we took a closer look at the frightening epidemic of elder financial abuse. In this article, we’ll discuss the issues surrounding the financial abuse of older adults and provide a comprehensive list of resources you can use to help protect yourself and those around you.

Senior couple concerned while calculating finances

What is elder financial abuse?

Elder financial abuse or exploitation is defined in the Older Americans Act of 2006 as:

“The fraudulent or otherwise illegal, unauthorized, or improper act or process of an individual, including a caregiver or fiduciary, that uses the resources of an older individual for monetary or personal benefit, profit, or gain, or that results in depriving an older individual of rightful access to, or use of, benefits, resources, belongings, or assets.”

In other words, this type of abuse involves taking advantage of an older person for financial gain. 

Elder financial abuse is big business. It’s estimated that older adults lose more than $36 billion every year to scams, fraud and exploitation.¹ It’s even more alarming that almost half of that money is lost due to tactics that – while deceptive in nature – are technically legal. With large numbers of Baby Boomers aging into retirement, experts predict the problem is only going to get worse.

The number of seniors of seniors in the U.S. who have experienced some form of financial abuse is estimated to be as high as 37 percent.² In other words, if you have three living grandparents or two older parents, there’s a good chance at least one of them has been a victim of financial abuse, and they may not even know it.

Who commits elder financial abuse?

The sheer number of financial abuse victims is frightening, but what may be even worse is that the abuse is often carried out by someone close to the victim. One survey found that two-thirds of financial crimes against the elderly are carried out by family, friends or other trusted individuals.³ The perpetrators of elder financial abuse can include:

  • Family members
  • Caretakers
  • Neighbors
  • Friends and acquaintances
  • Attorneys
  • Banks and other financial institutions
  • Health care providers

How is elder financial abuse carried out?

There are dozens of ways in which elder financial abuse is carried out. Here are some of the more common ways this type of abuse is perpetrated. 

 Impersonators 

  • Lotteries and sweepstakes
    A scammer may claim to be associated with a prize or lottery commission. They may tell the victim that they won the lottery or a special prize and that they need to send money to cover the taxes on their winnings.
  •  
  • Home repair
    One popular scam involves a “paver” telling a senior about a job the scammer claims to have completed in the neighborhood and that they have some leftover materials to either use today or get rid of. They may then claim that they can repair or repave the senior’s driveaway at a deeply discounted price and insist on receiving payment in advance. The scammer will typically leave without completing the promised work.
  •  
  • Law enforcement
    Thieves will sometimes call a senior citizen and pretend to be a law enforcement agent claiming that the senior owes a fine. They may also try to convince a fraud victim that one of their family members is in jail and that the victim should send bail money.
  •  
  • Charity
    One common scam involves someone impersonating a charity foundation in an effort to collect donations. This fraudulent appeal is especially common following a natural disaster.
  •  
  • Utility company
    In some cases, an abuser may impersonate someone from a cable, electric, water or other utility company and attempt to collect an unnecessary payment.
  •  
  • Grandchildren
    In one of the more heartbreaking types of financial abuse, a thief will call an older person pretending to be their grandchild and ask to borrow money to take care of an unexpected hardship.
  •  
  • Email phishing
    An email phishing scam can happen when a senior receives an email appearing to be from a legitimate entity such as the IRS requesting them to update or verify their personal information. When the senior reveals their social security number, credit card information or other sensitive information, the scammer may then use it for identity theft.

It happened: An 82-year old Texas woman was scammed out of her life’s savings. Scammers informed her that she won a sweepstakes and that she needed to send money to cover taxes and fees tied to the winnings. After the woman made the initial payment, the scam progressed with additional demands and conditions. After losing hundreds of thousands of dollars, the woman sadly committed suicide with $69 left to her name.

 Financial fraud

  • Predatory lenders
    Older clients are sometimes pressured into taking out reverse mortgages or other predatory loans with high interest rates. It may be against the client’s best interest to take out the loan, but they may be convinced to do so due to high pressure or fraudulent misinformation.
  •  
  • Investments
    Senior citizens are popular targets for pyramid schemes and other “get rich quick” schemes.
  •  
  • Identity theft
    When a victim’s identity is stolen, it can be used to open up fraudulent credit cards or other lines of credit in their name. A senior’s Social Security number is a popular target for scammers.

It happened: The CEO of a financial services company in California was charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud after conning 11 retirees out of more than $4 million. The man, who faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted, solicited the funds to be put into a retirement portfolio. He instead deposited the money into his own personal bank account and used it to buy jewelry, luxury cars and more.

 Caretakers, friends and family members

  • Power of attorney
    Someone who has been granted power of attorney can sometimes abuse that designation in order to acquire money, assets and possessions.
  •  
  • Bank cards or checks
    A caretaker who has access to a senior’s bank cards or checks can use them to withdraw money or make fraudulent purchases.
  •  
  • Threats of violence
    An older person who cannot defend themselves can be an easy target for a threat of violence in exchange for money or assets.
  •  
  • Withholding of care
    A friend or family member might threaten to not pick up the person’s groceries, not mow their lawn or withhold any other service unless they receive an exchange of money or a paid caretaker might neglect certain responsibilities while still collecting their full payment.

It happened: In Massachusetts, the niece of a disabled Army veteran used her uncle’s government VA grant — intended for a handicapped-accessible van — to buy herself an SUV. The woman was caught and was charged with larceny.

The effects of elder financial abuse

The effects of financial abuse can be extremely negative for a senior. In addition to financial losses, victims may also experience:

  • A loss of trust and an increased skepticism of everyone, even trustworthy friends and family members
  •  
  • Feelings of depression, fear, shame, anger and other negative emotions
  •  
  • Depleted physical health due to stress or the inability to afford proper care or nutrition
  •  
  • Alcoholism or other risky and destructive behavior
  •  
  • Loss of a residence, car or utilities due to inability to make payments
  •  
  • Dependency on government assistance

Why seniors can be vulnerable to financial abuse

Anyone can be a victim of financial abuse, but what makes seniors especially vulnerable? While an age-related decline in cognitive thinking could certainly make some older adults easier targets for abuse, there are other reasons for elder financial abuse.

Wealth

Older Baby Boomers have a median net worth of more than $241,000, and the 50-and-over demographic is responsible for 49 percent of all Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) sales in the United States.⁴ The concentration of wealth in this generation can make them more desirable targets for scammers and thieves.

More trusting nature

MIT conducted a study in which people of various age groups were asked if most people can be trusted. Baby Boomers gave the highest percentage of “yes” answers out of all age groups surveyed.⁴ This trusting nature could be attributed to growing up in a more trusting era, and it can point to a reason why a senior might be more likely to fall for a scam.

The notion of seniors being more trusting was backed up by a second study, conducted at UCLA. Participants were shown pictures of different faces and asked if they felt the face was trustworthy or untrustworthy. Once again, seniors gave the highest number of “trustworthy” answers, even for faces that gathered a high response of “untrustworthy” by younger participants.⁵

Further, older participants in the study exhibited less activity in their anterior insula while viewing the faces deemed “untrustworthy” by younger participants. This part of the brain supports interoceptive awareness, or what we commonly refer to as a “gut feeling.” The study results suggest that seniors may not as readily identify a potential risk, such as an untrustworthy person.

Declining financial capacity

Trust level isn’t the only thing that may contribute to an older adult’s vulnerability. There is also research that suggests older adults are significantly worse at making decisions related to their finances. One study conducted at Boston College suggested that a person’s financial literacy test scores decline by 1 percent every year over the age of 60.⁶

Another study found that although the capacity to make financial decisions may decline with age, an individual’s confidence to do so did not.⁷ This combination could lead many seniors to remain unaware of their financial vulnerability. 

When combined, you have a demographic that on average has wealth, is more trusting of other people, has a less active “gut feeling” and is not as adept at making financial decisions as they once were but maintains confidence in their ability to do so. These factors can all lead to an increased vulnerability to financial abuse.

How seniors can protect themselves

There are a number of ways in which seniors can better protect themselves from financial abuse.

  • Remain socially active
    Isolation is one thing that can contribute to a senior’s financial vulnerability, as being cut off from the outside world can make it more difficult for others to detect warning signs. An isolated individual may also feel that they lack the resources and relationships they need to feel financially secure.
  •  
  • Avoid joint bank accounts
    Some seniors might open a joint bank account so that a family member can more easily make payments or withdrawals on their behalf and help manage their finances. But a joint bank account can also serve as an easy way for theft and abuse to occur.
  •  
  • Don’t give up your home
    Particularly when moving into an assisted living facility, an older adult might consider signing over their home to a trusted family member in order to let that person handle the selling of the home. A home can be among a senior’s most valuable assets, however, and it may not be a safe idea to sign the home over to another person, no matter how trustworthy they might be.
  •  
  • Invoke a power of attorney
    The risk of financial abuse heightens after a person develops a decreased capacity to make independent financial decisions. Invoking a power of attorney can be one proactive way to prepare for the future of one’s wealth and assets. Seniors can consider getting legal advice to help in this process.
  •  
  • Set up a revocable trust
    Placing a senior’s assets in a revocable living trust and naming a fiduciary can be one way to protect against outsiders getting access to any of the senior’s assets that are of significant value.

The Senior Safe Act

While there are a number of ways in which seniors can protect themselves, Congress is also doing its part. The bipartisan Senior Safe Act was passed by the Senate on May 22nd and is expected to become law. Originally introduced to the House in 2017, the bill encourages financial advisors and their firms to report any exploitation of older clients. The bill also protects those financial advisors from liability and from violations of privacy laws when they report cases of elder financial abuse.

Resources for assistance

Below is a list of national and state resources that can help seniors protect themselves and help them recover from financial abuse.

National Resources

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Office for Older Americans
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is a U.S. government agency that regulates the activity of banks, lenders and other financial institutions to ensure consumers remain free of unfair, deceptive or abusive practices.

Phone:
855-411-2372

Federal Trade Commission (Phone scams)
The Federal Trade Commission is a consumer protection agency that aims to prevent unfair, fraudulent and deceptive business practices, such as phone scams. Learn how to recognize a telephone scam and what to do when you are targeted.

Phone:
877-382-4357

Federal Trade Commission (Identity thefy)
The Federal Trade Commission works to protect consumers from identity theft by providing resources for anyone who fears their personal information has been breached or lost. They also provide tips for protecting your identity and help recovering from identity theft.

Phone:
877-382-4357

Federal Trade Commission (Scam alerts)
The Federal Trade Commission publishes information about ongoing scams in order to build awareness and to help consumers to remain a step ahead of thieves.

Phone:
877-382-4357

National Institute of Justice
The National Institute of Justice conducts research and provides information about the financial exploitation of the elderly with the goal of improving knowledge and understanding of the crime.

Phone:
202-307-2942

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
The Securities and Exchange Commission aims to protect investors through education, regulation and the enforcement of fair and orderly markets.

Phone:
202-551-6551

U.S. Postal Service Inspection Service
The Postal Inspection Service maintains public trust in the mail system by enforcing laws designed to protect the U.S. Postal Service and its users from dangerous or illegal activity and provides assistance to victims of mail fraud, identity theft and other crimes.

Phone:
877-876-2455

Financial Services Roundtable
The BITS Financial Services Roundtable published a fraud protection toolkit complete with information about types of financial abuse provides tips to help consumers stay aware of potential risks.

Phone:
202-289-4322

Investor Protection Trust
The Investor Protection Trust is a non-profit organization that provides tools and information to help investors recognize and avoid investment fraud and financial abuse.

Phone:
202-775-2113

AnnualCreditReport.com
This website provides free annual credit reports that can be used to check for instances of identity theft and fraud.

Elder Financial Protection Network
The Elder Financial Protection Network is an organization dedicated to helping seniors recognize and avoid financial abuse.

Phone:
707-981-8403

National Elder Law Foundation
The National Elder Law Foundation is certified by the American Bar Association and serves by helping consumers to connect with attorneys specializing in elder law and needs.

Phone:
520-881-1076

Senior Fraud Education Program
CaregiverStress.com provides information and resources concerning fraud for both caregivers and seniors.

Phone:
888-575-0946

National Adult Protective Services Association
The national non-profit organization has representation in all 50 states and works to increase awareness of elder abuse through education and advocacy.

Phone:
202-370-6292

U.S. Department of Justice
The Department of Justice fights financial crimes against older Americans through outreach efforts that include scam alerts, training and more.

Phone:
202-514-2000

National Center on Elder Abuse
The NCEA is a national resource center that provides elder abuse information, resources and training to the public and community-based organizations.

Phone:
855-500-3537

National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse
A non-profit organization, the NCPEA is made up of researchers, practitioners, educators and advocates all dedicated to the prevention of abuse of senior adults.

Phone:
416-342-1655

American Bankers Association
The ABA provides tips and information designed to help older consumers remain safe from fraud.

Phone:
800-226-5377

Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement
WISER aims to improve the long-term financial security of women through education and advocacy and provides useful tools and information related to elder financial abuse.

Phone:
202-393-5452

Department of Health & Human Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services builds awareness of elder fraud, allows for fraud to be reported and provides support for victims and their families.

Phone:
877-696-6775

State Elder Abuse Programs

Select your state

 

Alabama

Alabama Department of Human Resources

Phone: 
334-242-1350

Alabama Department of Senior Services Elder Abuse Program

Phone: 
334-242-5743

Alabama Senior Medicare Patrol

Phone: 
800-243-5463

Alaska

Department of Administration Office of Public Advocacy

Phone: 
907-334-5989

Alaska Department of Health and Social Services

Phone: 
907-269-3666

Consumer Protection Unit

Phone: 
907-269-5200

Arizona

Arizona Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
602-542-4791

Arizona Division of Aging and Adult Services

Phone: 
602-542-4791

Arizona Long-Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
602-364-2860

California

California Department of Social Services

Phone: 
916-651-8848 

California Long Term Care Ombudsmen Program

Phone: 
800-231-4024

California Courts - Elder and Dependent Adult Abuse

California Attorney General’s Medi-Cal Fraud and Elder Abuse Bureau

Phone: 
916-210-6276 

California Department of Business Oversight - Seniors Against Investment Fraud

Phone: 
916-327-7585

California Bankers Association - Stop Elder Financial Abuse

Phone: 
916-438-4400

Colorado

Colorado Adult Protective Services

Colorado Department of Human Services

Phone: 
303-866-5700

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
303-866-5700

Colorado Area Agency on Aging

Phone: 
303-455-1000

Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (Division of Financial Services)

Phone: 
303-894-7855

Stop Fraud Colorado

Phone: 
800-222-4444

AARP Foundation ElderWatch Colorado

Phone: 
800-222-4444

Colorado Coalition for Elder Right and Abuse Prevention

Connecticut

Department of Rehabilitation Services State Unit on Aging

Phone: 
860-424-5274

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
866-388-1888

Connecticut State Department of Social Services

Phone: 
855-626-6632

Delaware

Delaware Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
302-255-9040

Delaware Department of Justice Fraud & Consumer Protection Division

Phone: 
302-577-8600

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-223-9074

Delaware Money Management Program

Phone: 
302-857-5006
 

District Of Columbia

DC Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
202-541-3950

DC Office on Aging

Phone:
 202-724-5626

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
202-727-3400

Office of the Inspector General - Fraud and Abuse

Phone: 
202-727-2540

Florida

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-962-2873

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
888-831-0404

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
850-414-3300

Georgia

Adult Protective Services - Elder Abuse

Phone: 
866-552-4464

Georgia Council on Aging

Phone: 
404-657-5343

Georgia Council of Community Ombudsmen

Phone: 
404-627-1057

Department of Human Services - Division of Aging Services

Phone: 
404-657-5258

Office of Attorney General - Consumer Protection Guide for Older Adults

Phone: 
404-651-8600

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
866-552-4464

Hawaii

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
808-832-5115

Department of the Attorney General - ID theft

Phone: 
808-586-1500

Hawaii Executive Office on Aging

Phone: 
808-586-0100

Senior Medicare Patrol Hawaii

Phone: 
800-296-9422

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
808-587-0770

Hawaii County Office of Aging

Phone: 
808-643-2372
 

Idaho

Idaho Commission on Aging - Elder Abuse Prevention

Phone: 
208-334-3833

Idaho Commission on Aging - Medicare Fraud

Phone: 
208-334-3833

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
208-577-2855

Office of Attorney General - Medicaid Fraud

Phone: 
208-334-4100

Office of Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
208-334-2424

Illinois

Adult Protective Services for Seniors

Phone: 
866-800-1409

Illinois Department on Aging

Phone: 
800-252-8966 

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-339-3200

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
800-243-5377
 

Indiana 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-457-8283

Medicaid/Public Assistance Fraud

Phone: 
800-403-0864

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-622-4484

Office of Attorney General - Senior Fraud

Phone: 
317-232-6330

Indiana MoneyWise

Phone: 
317-232-6531
 

Iowa

Iowa Department of Human Services - Dependent Adult Abuse

Phone: 
800-362-2178

Elder Justice & Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-532-3213

Iowa Department of Inspections & Appeals - Fraud reporting

Phone: 
800-831-1394

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-532-3213

Office of the Attorney General - Older Iowans

Phone: 
515-281-5926

Iowa Department on Aging

Phone: 
800-532-3213

Kansas

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

Phone: 
785-296-4986

Senior Medicare Patrol

Phone: 
800-432-3535 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
888-369-4777

Attorney General's Office - Consumer Protection Division

Phone: 
785-296-2215

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
785-296-3017

Medicaid Fraud & Abuse

Phone: 
785-296-2215
 

Kentucky 

Office of Medicaid Fraud and Abuse

Phone: 
502-696-5405

Scam Alerts

Phone: 
502-696-5389

Consumer Protection

Phone: 
502-696-5389

Division of Audits and Investigations

Phone: 
800-372-2973

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-372-2973
 

Louisiana 

Aging and Adult Services

Phone: 
800-898-4910 

Governor's Office of Elderly Affairs

Phone: 
225-342-7100

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
225-342-7100

Elder Fraud Prevention

Phone: 
800-351-4889

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-898-4910

Maine

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
800-499-0229

Office of the Maine Attorney General

Phone: 
207-626-8800

Office of Elder Services

Phone: 
207-287-3707

Maryland

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-332-6347

Department of Aging

Phone: 
410-767-1100

Long Term Care Ombudsmen

Phone: 
410-767-1100

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
410-576-6300

Massachusetts

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-922-2275 

Assisted Living/Community Ombudsman

Phone: 
617-727-7750

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-243-4636

Executive Office of Elder Affairs

Phone: 
617-727-7750

Office of Attorney General

Phone: 
617-727-2200

Michigan

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
855-444-3911

Department of Health & Human Services - Abuse and Neglect

Phone: 
855-444-3911 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
866-485-9393

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
517-373-1110

Aging & Adult Services Agency

Phone: 
517-373-8230

Minnesota

Minnesota Board on Aging

Phone: 
651-431-2500

Department of Human Services - Fraud Report

Phone: 
844-880-1574

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
651-431-2500

Office of the Attorney General - Senior Citizens

Phone: 
651-296-3353

Department of Human Services - Vulnerable Adult Protection and Elder Abuse

Phone: 
844-880-1574

Office of the Inspector General

Phone: 
651-431-2000

Mississippi

Office of the Attorney General - Vulnerable Adult Unit

Phone: 
601-359-4158

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-227-7308 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
601-359-4927
 

Missouri

Adult Protective Services - Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation of the Elderly and Disabled

Phone: 
800-392-0210

Department of Health and Senior Services

Phone: 
800-392-0210

Office of the Attorney General - Protecting Missouri Seniors

Phone: 
573-751-3321

Ombudsman Program

Phone: 
573-526-0727

Nursing Home Inspections

Phone: 
573-526-8524

Missourians Stopping Adult Financial Exploitation

Phone: 
800-392-0210
 

Montana

Adult Protective Services - Senior & Long Term Care

Phone: 
844-277-9300

Department of Justice - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
800-481-6896

Senior and Long Term Care Division

Phone: 
844-277-9300 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-332-2272

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
800-551-3191 

Senior Medicare Patrol

Phone: 
406-728-7682
 

Nebraska

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-652-1999

State Unit on Aging

Phone: 
402-471-2307

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
402-471-2307

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
800-727-6432
 

Nevada 

Aging and Disability Services

Phone: 
775-687-4210

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
775-687-4210

Office of the Attorney General - Senior Protection

Phone: 
702-486-3132
 

New Hampshire

Adult Protection Program

Phone: 
603-271-7014

Bureau of Elderly and Adult Services

Phone: 
603-271-9203

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
603-271-4375

Department of Justice - Elder Abuse & Financial Exploitation

Phone: 
603-271-3658
 

New Jersey

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
877-222-3737

Division of Aging Services

Phone: 
877-222-3737

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
877-582-6995
 

New Mexico

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
866-654-3219

Aging & Long Term Services Department

Phone: 
800-432-2080

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-432-2080

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
844-255-9210
 

New York

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
844-697-3505

Office for the Aging

Phone: 
844-697-6321

Office of the Attorney General - Bureau of Consumer Frauds & Protection

Phone: 
800-771-7755

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
855-582-6769
 

North Carolina

Aging and Adult Services

Phone: 
919-855-3400

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
919-855-4800

Department of Justice - Elder Abuse Victims

Phone: 
800-662-7030

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
919-855-4800

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
919-855-4800
 

North Dakota

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
701-328-2538

Adults and Aging Services

Phone: 
855-462-5465

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
855-462-5465

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Resources

Phone: 
701-328-2210
 

Ohio

Department of Aging

Phone: 
800-266-4346 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-365-3112

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
800-282-0515
 

Oklahoma

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
877-751-2972 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
405-521-6734 

Senior Legal Services

Phone: 
405-521-2281
 

Oregon

Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations

Phone: 
503-945-5600

Seniors & People with Physical Disabilities Offices

Phone: 
541-967-8630 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-522-2602

Oregon Department of Justice

Phone: 
503-378-4400

Pennsylvania

Department of Aging

Phone: 
717-783-1550 

Office of the Attorney General - Protecting Seniors

Phone: 
717-787-3391 

Ombudsman Program

Phone: 
717-783-1550 

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
717-783-1550
 

Rhode Island

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
401-462-3000 

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection Unit

Phone: 
401-274-4400 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
401-785-3340 

Division of Elderly Affairs

Phone: 
401-462-3000

South Carolina 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
803-898-7601 

Office on Aging

Phone: 
803-734-9900 

Office of the Attorney General

Phone: 
803-734-3970

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-868-9095
 

South Dakota 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
605-773-5990 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
866-854-5465 

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Information

Phone: 
605-773-4400
 

Tennessee

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
888-277-8366 

Commission on Aging and Disability

Phone: 
615-741-2056 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
615-837-5112

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
615-741-1671
 

Texas 

Department of Aging

Phone: 
855-937-2372 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
877-323-6466 

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Protection

Phone: 
800-621-0508 

Adult Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation

Phone: 
800-252-5400
 

Utah

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
801-538-3910 

Aging & Adult Services

Phone: 
800-371-7897 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
801-538-4171 

Office of the Attorney General - Financial Fraud

Phone: 
800-244-4636
 

Vermont

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-564-1612 

Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living

Phone: 
802-241-2401 

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Information

Phone: 
800-649-2424
 

Virginia

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
888-832-3858 

Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Phone: 
800-552-5019 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
804-565-1600 

Office of the Attorney General - Elder Abuse

Phone: 
804-786-4718
 

Washington

Adult Abuse and Prevention

Phone: 
866-363-4276 

Aging and Long Term Support Administration

Phone: 
360-725-2300 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-562-6028 

Office of the Attorney General - Consumer Issues

Phone: 
800-551-4636

West Virginia 

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
304-558-0628 

Bureau of Senior Services

Phone: 
304-558-3317 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
304-558-3317 

Office of the Attorney General - Senior Protection

Phone: 
304-558-1155
 

Wisconsin

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
608-266-1865 

Area Agencies on Aging

Phone: 
608-266-1865 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
800-815-0015
 

Wyoming

Adult Protective Services

Phone: 
800-457-3659 

Department of Health - Aging Division

Phone: 
307-777-7995 

Office of the Attorney General - Division of Victim Services

Phone: 
307-777-7200 

Long Term Care Ombudsman

Phone: 
307-777-2885